Southwark Cathedral, London

Slide 1
Slide 2
Slide 3
Slide 4
Slide 5
Slide 6
Slide 7
Slide 8
Slide 9
Slide 10
Slide 11
Slide 12
southwark southwark southwark southwark southwark southwark southwark southwark southwark southwark southwark southwark

Norman and Underwood Ltd completed an 8 month major conservation project at Southwark Cathedral in April 2014. The works involved primarily re-roofing and stone masonry/render works under the provision of a temporary roof enclosure to the South Aisle, North Transept, Harvard Chapel and North Choir Aisle. The works included over 20 tonnes of sand cast lead, re-cast at our base in Leicester, from the original lead.

Southwark Cathedral was originally referenced as a Minster in the Domesday Book (1086) and renamed St Saviours by Henry VIII. The church became Southwark Cathedral in 1905. The Cathedral holds five services a day throughout the year and the surrounding grounds are often crowded with local people and visitors. The Cathedral lies on the south bank of the River Thames and is close to London Bridge. The building has been a place of Christian worship for well over 1,000 years.

There were some challenges for the team; ensuring safety of the general public in such a busy space and also working in an environment with limited space. Norman and Underwood’s site foreman and team were commended by the Dean and the Cathedral’s Work Manager for the quality of the work and communication and cooperation with the daily activities of the Cathedral. Estimator/Surveyor Geoffrey Beetham commented, “Our experienced team have continued to produce high quality work and another successful contract of which we can be proud.”